Litigation

What You Should And Should Not Do With Social Media After You Are In An Accident

November 12, 2018
Posted in Litigation

“Social media has changed how we communicate, share, stay informed, and keep in touch.” It is taking over our lives. We diligently check our profiles to see if our most recent post got enough likes. In today’s world, we tend to find ourselves connected at the hip to our phones. Constantly updating our own social […]

Hey Alexa – Resolve My Personal Injury Case!!!

November 8, 2018
Posted in Litigation

Recent news stories and articles have started to focus on an emerging trend – the role artificial intelligence (AI) is going to play in our society moving forward.  We already see it in our homes with devices like Amazon’s Alexa.  State legislatures are crafting regulations to prepare for self-driving vehicles.  Every day, more and more […]

Pennsylvania Police Officers On Notice That They Can Be Liable For Dangerous Police Chases

November 2, 2018
Posted in Litigation

In Sauers v. Borough of Nesquehoning, the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit opened the door for Pennsylvania citizens to sue police officers who cause injuries during dangerous, high speed chases.  Generally, police officers cannot be sued unless they have notice that they can be liable for their specific actions, due to […]

A Doctor Can Still Be Negligent Even If You Are Told Everything About A Procedure

October 31, 2018
Posted in Litigation

On October 23, 2018, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court heard argument in Mitchell v. Shikora.  While, on the surface, Mitchell looks like a run-of-the-mill medical malpractice case, it actually  presents a unique question for the Court’s consideration: whether malpractice defendants are able to introduce evidence of a medical procedure’s risks and complications at trial. In Mitchell, […]

Judge v. Jury – Who Makes the Call in our Judicial System?

October 30, 2018
Posted in Litigation

Simply put on any legal television drama and you will inevitably see the courtroom scene where the judge presides over the case and the jury renders a verdict.  However, the role each plays in dispensing justice in reality is unique, and was recently clarified by the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania in a case handled by […]

Why Can’t We Tell The Jury How Much We Want For Our Injuries?

January 30, 2018
Posted in Litigation

Often many clients will ask, when before a jury, “how much are you going to tell them to give me for my injuries?”  My answer is always the same – “the law does not allow us to tell the jury how much to give, they have to come up with that number by themselves.”  This […]

Having Surgery? Know Your Rights. It’s Your Doctor Who Must Obtain Informed Consent

January 10, 2018
Posted in Litigation

Recently the Pennsylvania Supreme Court announced that a patient undergoing surgery must be counseled fully and directly by the surgeon performing the procedure. It is the duty of the surgeon to obtain informed consent. The doctrine of informed consent protects a patient’s autonomy and body in determining what medical treatment should be allowed.  It is […]

All Slips, Trips and Falls Are Not the Same

January 4, 2018
Posted in Litigation

A great number of cases are filed in courts on behalf of victims suffering major injuries due to slipping and tripping on hazards that otherwise could have been avoided. Many of these injuries occur in grocery stores where there is a lot of produce and food on display and ready to be grabbed and put […]

Update – Medical Malpractice – How Long Do I Have to File a Lawsuit?

December 18, 2017
Posted in Litigation

Last year, our “Legal Spotlight” blog discussed the period of time in which you have to file a medical malpractice lawsuit.  As with many legal issues, the answer is constantly evolving.  Since that article was published,  the Supreme Court has decided to hear a case that yet again could impact the timeline a victim of malpractice […]

If a Provision of a Non-competition Agreement is Overbroad, There is a Risk That the Entire Agreement may be Thrown Out

November 27, 2017
Posted in Litigation

In Pittsburgh Logistics Systems, Inc. v. Ceravolo, et al., the Superior Court of Pennsylvania considered whether the geographic scope of a non-competition agreement was overbroad and whether the excessiveness of that provision rendered the non-competition agreement void in its entirety. Employees of Pittsburgh Logistics worked within the trucking industry.  They were required to sign employment […]

Featured Posts

Subscribe

Practice Area Topics

Search