Streamlined Notary Acknowledgments Take Effect

October 25, 2017
Posted in General News
Streamlined Notary Acknowledgments Take Effect

On October 26, 2017, changes to the Pennsylvania Revised Uniform Law on Notarial Acts take effect that streamline the standard language for the Notary Acknowledgment form commonly used throughout Pennsylvania. Although the previous acknowledgement forms should still be acceptable, the new, standard short forms are deemed to satisfy the requirements for the preparation of notarial certificates. Under the changes, an acknowledgement in an individual capacity will require the following minimal language and form:

Commonwealth of _________
County of ________________

This record was acknowledged before me on [date] by [name(s) of individual(s) signing].

[Signature of notarial officer]
[Notary Stamp]
[Title of office]
My commission expires:

Additionally, for corporate acknowledgments or other signatures made in a representative capacity, such as signing on behalf of an estate or trust, the following form may now be used:

Commonwealth of _________
County of ________________

This record was acknowledged before me on [date] by [name(s) of individual(s) signing] as [type of authority (i.e. trustee, manager, executor)] who represent(s) that he/she/they are authorized to act on behalf of [name of party/entity on behalf of whom record was executed].

[Signature of notarial officer]
[Notary Stamp]
[Title of office]
My commission expires:

Remember to make sure the correct person signs on behalf of the entity, and under the correct title, as discussed in a previous article linked here: http://www.hrmml-legal-spotlight.com/business-corporate/whats-in-a-name. In addition to these acknowledgment form changes, additional changes pertaining to notarial requirements, regulations and fees will take effect.  One such change clarifies that there is an affirmative obligation imposed upon notarial officers to verify the identity of any person for whom a notarial act is performed.  As a result, a valid notary acknowledgment date should not predate the date set forth on the document that establishes when the document was executed.  Otherwise, the notary would be acknowledging a document that, according to the document date, was not yet in existence.

Featured Posts

Subscribe

Practice Area Topics

Search